Tag Archives: stamps

Law 1 – The Field of Play

According to the Laws of the Game for Association Football (Soccer), Law 1 deals with the field of play.  

Field Surface

FIFA and the IFAB specify that the field of play must be a natural, or where the competition rules allow a synthetic, surface.

Markings

The field is to be rectangular and marked with continuous lines, the lines belong to the area they mark. The longer boundary lines are touchlines and the shorter ones are the goal lines. The field is divided in two halves by the halfway line. The midpoint of the halfway line is where the centre mark is placed and it is surrounded by a circle with a radius of 10 yards (9.15 m) around it. All lines must be the same colour and width. The width of the lines should be no wider than 5 inches (12 cm).  The goal lines must be the same width of the goalposts and crossbar. Other lines off the field of play can be made.  The purpose of these lines is to mark 10 yards from the corner arc.

Dimensions

For normal competitions the field should have a length along the touchline (sideline) between 100 yards (90 m) and 130 yards (120 m). The width of the field along the goal line should be between 50 yards (45 m) and 100 yards (90 m).  

For international mathes the dimensions should be between 110 yards (100 m) and 120 yards (110 m) along the touchline.  The maximum width (measured along the goal line) is 80 yards (75 m) with a minimum width of 70 yards (64 m).

The Goal Area

For the goal area two lines perpendicular to the goal line 6 yards (5.5 m) from the inside of the goalposts for a length of 6 yards. These lines are joined by a line parallel to the goal line.

The Penalty Area

The penalty area is the area bounded by two lines that are perpendicular to the goal line 18 yards (16.5 m) from the inside of the goal post.  These lines are 18 yards in length and are joined by a line parallel to the goal line.

A penalty spot is to be placed 12 yards (11 m) from the mid point between the goal posts. An arc 10 yards from the penalty spot is drawn outside the penalty area.

The Corner Area

The corner area is defined as a quarter circle drawn 1 yard (1 m) from each corner flagpost. A flagpost is required in each corner.

The Technical Area

The technical area only realtes to stadiums that have a designated seating area for team officials, substitutes and substituted players. The area extends 1 yard from the sides of the seating area and upto 1 yard from the touchline.

Goals

A goal must be placed on the centre of each goal line. A goal consists of 2 vertical posts, joined at the top by a crossbar. The posts are placed an equal distance from the corner flagposts. The goals should be 8 feet (2.44 m) from the lower edge to the ground and be 8 yards (7.32 m) apart from the inner posts.

Other aspects of Law 1 deal with goal line technology, commercial advertising, logos and video assistant referees.

This post is a the scond in a series I am writing on the laws of the game. The first post originally written on October 4, 2016 on Law 2 – The Ball can be viewed read here.

The SS Zambezia

the SS Zambezia

The SS Zambezia was constructed in 1903 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co. of Middlesbrough for Empreza Nacional de Nav a Vap of Lisbon as a cargo-passenger liner.

Her tonnage was 1174 gross tons with a length of 220 feet and a breadth of 33 feet. She had a single, triple expansion steam engine designed for 9 knots.

Completed in September 1903, The Zambezia was delivered to her owners for service. In May 1917 the Zambezia caught fire and burned out while laden with cased petrol and was deemed a total loss.

She was eventually salvaged and then in 1920, the Zambezia sold to Thesen’s Steam Ship company of South Africa. She was sold to the Colonial Navigation Company(Cia. Colonial de Navegacao) of Lisbon in 1931 and renamed the Buzi.

Sold to the Colonial Steamships Co. Ltd. of Port Louis, Mauritius in 1934, she was renamed the Zambezia and was used primarily in domestic service. She was sold to and delivered to the breakers in 1951.

Sources:
ShipStamps.co.uk, https://shipstamps.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9148&p=9301&hilit=zambezia
Tees Built Ships, http://teesbuiltships.co.uk/view.php?a1PageSize=&year_built=&builder=&a1Order=Sorter_name&a1Dir=DESC&a1Page=3&ref=165274&vessel=ZAMBEZIA


PS Skibladner

Originally published May 5, 2017.

Issued in 1981 as one in a set of 4 commemorating Norwegian lake shipping the Paddle Steamer (PSSkibladneris featured on the 1k.10 value.

The PS Skibladner is the only paddle steamer operating in Norway. Her maiden voyage was on August 2nd, 1856. This makes her the worlds oldest paddle steamer operating a scheduled service. During her long career she has sunk twice, been re-floated and extensively renovated.

Still operating on lake Mjøsa between Eidsvoll, Gjøvik and Lillehammer she offers scenic tours and cultural events.

The PS Skipbladner is registered at 206 tons with a length overall of 164 feet and a beam of 16.6 feet. She has a draught of 8¼ feet and carries 230 passengers.

Sources: 
http://www.shipstamps.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6984&p=6980&hilit=Skibladner
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skibladner

Canadian Corvettes

Originally published May 2, 2017.

On July 1st, 1942, the Canadian government issued a series of stamps to celebrate Canada and Canadianscontributions to the war effort.

The 20¢ value was titled Corvette Ready for Launching and was designed by Herman Schwartz and engraved by Clifford Dawson and Walter Rosch. The Canadian Bank Note Company printed 62,028,166 copies of the stamp. It was perforated 12 on all sides. The design is based on a photograph of HMCS La Malbaie

Pictured on the stamp is a corvette ready to be launched. This design was relevant as many of Canada’s smaller ship yards constructed “Flower” class corvettes during the war. In total the Royal Canadian Navy ordered 104 corvettes from Canadian shipyards. Canadian shipyards also built the corvettes for the Royal and US navies.

Sources:
Canadian Postal Archives Database – Record on Corvette Ready for Launching
Canadian Postal Archives Database
Wikipedia – Flower-class corvette

Solidarity

Originally published February 21, 2017.

Solidarity was an independent Polish Trade Union that was founded on the 17th of September 1980, under the leadership of Lech Walęsa at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk.

Solidarity was the first trade union to operate in a Warsaw Pact country that was not controlled by a communist party. Through its first year membership reached 9.5 million members. Membership peaked at 10 million members (about 1/3 of the working population) by its first congress in 1981.

Through the 1980’s Solidarity was a social movement that used civil resistance to advance workers rights and social change. The Polish government attempted to bust the union by imposing martial law and years of political repression.

Throughout these years Solidarity was supported by the Pope and the United States. The financial support provided by the US is estimated to be as much as $50 million.

Despite the best efforts of the Polish government, Solidarity would not be defeated and it was forced to negotiate with Walęsa and his union.

By the end of August 1989 Solidarity formed a coalition government. This was followed in 1990 by Lech Walęsa becoming president of Poland.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidarity_(Polish_trade_union)

The Sombrero Galaxy

Originally published October 12, 2016.

Discovered in 1871, the Sombrero Galaxy is located in the constellation of Virgo a mere 28 million light years from Earth. It is 30% the size of the Milky Way Galaxy and is known for its prominent bulge in the centre.

It gets its name from the striking resemblance to a Mexican hat called a sombrero. Due to its brightness, it is easily viewed by amateur astronomers through a good pair of binoculars or a backyard telescope.

For more information, you can go to Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombrero_Galaxy.

The Ships of the Russian Weapons of Victory Series

Originally published October 10, 2016.

Four ship stamps were issued in 2013 by the Russian Postal Authority to commemorate weapons that helped contribute to the “Russian” victory in WWII.

The first stamp in the set depicts the minesweeper, Mina.
The Mina was built as a fast coastal minesweeper for the Soviet Russian Navy at Sevastopol.   Completed in the same year construction started she was launched on August 20, 1937.
Mina‘s particulars are:
Displacement 410 tons standard, 503 ton full load. Dim. 62.0 x 7.2 x 2.26m (draught); Powered by two 42-BMRN-6 diesel engines producing 2,000 hp; twin shafts; speed 18.5 knots.
Armament 1 – 100mm gun B-24; 1 – 45mm gun 21-K; 3 – 12.7mm MG (Machine Guns); 2 DCR (Depth Charge Racks) (20); 31 mines and sweeps.  The Mina was designed to have a Crew 44
She was delivered to the Russian Navy on August 28, 1938, and served in the Black Sea.  Through the four years of WWII, she sailed 47 000 miles through mine infested waters and was responsible for escorting numerous ships.  Through her service, during the war, she had come under air attack no less than 300 times.  In July 1944 the Mina was awarded the Order of the Red Banner.
The next stamp features the patrol boat Metel. This ship was constructed in sections that were shipped via train and sent to the Soviet Far East and assembled at the  Dalzavod Shipyard in Vladivostok.
Metel‘s particlars are:
Displacement 450 tons standard, 530 ton full load, dim. 71.5 x 7.4 x 2.6m. (draught); Powered by Curtiss geared steam turbines, 6,290 hp, speed 24 knots, economical 14 knots; Range by a speed of 14 knots, 1,200 mile.
Armament 2 – 102mm; 3 – 37mm guns; and 3 – 12.7mm MG.; 3 – 450mm torpedo tubes; 2 – mortars; carried 48 mines and 30 depth charges. Fitted out with mine sweeping equipment.  She had a crew compliment of 108.
Throughout WWII the Metel escorted ships through minefields.  During the battle of Chongjin, in Northern Korea  the ship and crew distinguished themselves through expert fire support shooting down enemy aircraft, destroying an armoured train, taking out enemy coastal batteries and searchlight installations, destroying eight concreted fortifications and gun positions, and causing serious damage to an enemy landing craft.
64 of the Metel‘s crew were awarded with orders and medals.  Her Captain was conferred with the title “Hero of the Soviet Union”.
The river armoured craft BKA-75 is the next stamp in the set.  She was built at Zelenodolsk and completed in December 1941.
The particulars of the BKA-75 are:
Displacement: 49.75 standard tons, 52.16 tons full load, dim. 25.3 x 4.04 x 0.87m (draught); Powered by engines of 1,800 hp, maximum speed 37.4 km/h, economical speed 23 km/h; Range up to 680 km.
Armament 2 – 76.2mm guns; 2 – 12.7 and 2 – 7.62mm MG. The BKA-75 had a crew 17.
Through out WWII BKA-75 served along side Russian army units and participated in the defence of Stalingrad and worked on the Volga river until September 1943 when she was loaded on a rail car and transported to the Azov Sea.  After suffering serious damage and repairs she joined the Danube Flotilla where she took part in the liberation of: Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Austria.  She also particpated in the liberation of Belgrade.
The last stamp in this set displays the gunboat Usyskin.  Orinally built as a paddle steamer tug for service on rivers, she was converted to a gun boat in July 1941.
The Usyskin‘s particulars are:
Displacement 400 tons, dim. 56.4 x 17.1 x 1.2m;
One 480 hp steam engine , speed 8.5 knots.
Armament: 2 – 45mm guns; 1 – 7.62mm MG.
The Usyskin participated in the defence of Stalingrad as a unit in the Volga River Flotilla.  In February of 1943, she received the Order of the Red Banner.
In April of 1943, the Usyskin was severely damaged as a result of a mine.  In July 1943, she was converted back to a tug.
References:

The Austrian State Opera and Theatre House

Originally published October 4, 2016.
Issued by Austria in 2005 the country of Austria celebrated the 50th Anniversaries of the reopening of their national opera and theatre houses.
The Opera House
Construction on the state opera house commenced in 1861 based on a design by August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll.  Built by the renowned architect and builder Josef Hlavka, the opera house was finally finished in 1869.  The opera house is pictured in the stamp on the right in the souvenir sheet above.  It was extensively damaged during World War II and completion of the renovations and reconstruction was finished in 1955.
The National Theatre
Featured on the left stamp in the above souvenir sheet is the Austrian National Theater.  One of the most important German language theatres in the world, it opened in 1888 and was designed by Gottfried Semper and Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer.  As with the opera house, it was extensively damaged during World War II.

Law 2 – The Ball

Originally published October 4, 2016.
When I was younger and much more in shape I was a soccer (football) referee.  On top of being great exercise and fun, there was the memorization of the 17 laws of the game.
This blog post will focus on Law 2 – The Ball.
Law 2 states that the ball must be:
  • spherical
  • made of leather or another suitable material
  • have a circumference of not more than 70 cm and not less than 68cm
  • At the start of the match, it cannot weigh more than 450 g and not less than 410 g
  • have a pressure of not more than 0.6 – 1.1 atmospheres.
Other considerations on Law 2 are that should the ball become defective during a match, the match will be restarted by a drop ball at the location where the original ball became defective.  If it became defective at a penalty or kicks from the mark, the penalty will be retaken.  If the ball becomes defective during a restart the ball is replaced and the game restarted accordingly.
I have to say in my 16+ years as a referee I have never had to replace a defective ball, many that were lost on roads and highways, but none as a result of becoming defective during the game.
From a topical perspective, there are plenty of stamps that have been issued with soccer balls appearing on them. Below are some more.